Exemptions

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How to File for an Exemption on Your Home
1. Obtain an application form(s) at your local appraisal district office.
 2. Return the form(s) to the appraisal district office after Jan. 1 but no later than April 30.  Be sure to include a copy of your driver’s license or state-issued personal identification card and other information as indicated on the application form.
 3. Provide all the information and documentation requested.  For example, if you are claiming an age 65-or-older or disabled exemption, you may need to show proof of age or disability.  Remember that making false statements on your exemption application is a criminal offense.
4. You may late file for a homestead exemption and a disabled veteran’s exemption up to one year after the date upon which taxes would become delinquent.  You will receive a new tax bill with a lower amount.  If you have already paid your taxes, you will receive a refund.
5. You may file for the 100 percent or totally disabled veteran or the surviving spouse exemption when you move in the middle of year on your new residence homestead for the remaining part of the year.
 6. You may file for the age 65 or older exemption for up to one year after the date on which you become age 65.
 7. If the chief appraiser mails a written request for more information, you have 30 days from the postmark date to reply.
 8. The chief appraiser must notify you, in writing, within five days if he or she denies or modifies your exemption.  This notice must explain how you can protest before the appraisal review board.
 9. Once you receive a homestead or disabled veteran’s exemption, you do not have to apply for it again unless the chief appraiser asks you to do so or unless your qualifications change.
10. If you move to a new home, you must fill out a new application to receive any exemptions and to transfer any tax ceiling.
 11. If you become disabled, you should file a new application the year you become disabled in order to receive more exemptions.

For additional information on Texas Property Tax Exemptions please see the following:

Partial Exemption List – 2016

Texas Property Tax Exemptions